Gypsy Librarian's Alchemical Annex

A commonplace book on the web for me. Basically this is sort of annex for my commonplace blog Alchemical Thoughts
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fantagraphics:

"All of these books are essential purchases for comics fans… These are the books that best show off how EC took genre stories seriously, striving to create comics that didn’t treat readers as naive or ignorant." – Los Angeles Times

"Fantagraphics’ current series of handsome hardcovers makes familiar material fresh by focusing on individual artists… it’s never been easier to appreciate the contributions of these iconic inkslingers." – Chicago Tribune

"…I am not only appreciative…but also very impressed. [The books] are spectacular packages of their featured artist and their stories." – Al Feldstein

"These collections show comics in a pure, unadulterated form. Before the Superhero frenzy, before ’60s cynicism, and just before the Comics Code Authority started trimming all the gory and sexy fun from the pages with their seal of approval." – Under the Radar

Judgment Day and Other Stories (The EC Comics Library)
illustrated by Joe Orlando; written by Al Feldstein, Ray Bradbury et al.

192-page black & white 7.25” x 10.25” hardcover • $29.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-727-7

Due to arrive in about 2-4 weeks. Click the thumbnails for larger versions; get more info, see more previews and pre-order your copy here:

http://www.fantagraphics.com/judgmentday

© William M. Gaines Agent, Inc.

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Another volume in this fine fantagraphics series I am adding to my TBR.

nprbooks:

Libraries in many big cities often serve as de facto homeless shelters — a place for people living on the streets to find quiet and warmth — and it can make others, there to just check out books or videos, uncomfortable.

KQED’s Scott Shafer reports that’s why the San Francisco Public Library has hired a full-time social worker. She spends her days roaming the library floors, keeping an eye out for regulars who look like they could use her help. And sometimes she hires the formerly homeless patrons she’s helped, like Joe Bank, to do outreach under her supervision.

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A fine example of the good a public library can do: practical, humble, and of true service.

retrogasm:

Vikki Dougan, 1957

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I have to say, that is one nice back.

retrogasm:

Vikki Dougan, 1957

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I have to say, that is one nice back.

nprbooks:

Image: Writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Paco Junquera/Getty Images)

Today’s top book news item:

Gabriel García Márquez left behind an unpublished manuscript when he died last week at age 87, Cristobal Pera, editorial director of Penguin Random House Mexico, told The Associated Press. Pera added that Marquez’s family has not yet decided whether to publish it.

Meanwhile, the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia published an extract of the work, tentatively titled We’ll See Each Other in August (En agosto nos vemos). In the excerpt, a middle-aged woman named Ana Magdalena Bach has a fling during her annual trip to a tropical island to put flowers on her mother’s grave. She stays at a hotel overlooking a lagoon full of herons. Ana, though she’s married, meets a man at the hotel and begins an affair with him. The excerpt has a strong sense of place — García Márquez’s descriptions are lush with flowers and tropical life – and a ripple of eroticism travels through it, from the touch of perfume Ana puts behind her ear at the beginning of the chapter to the thunderstorm during her encounter with the man from the hotel.

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Would be interesting to see if it does get published (assuming it is complete).

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I definitely concur with much of this list. For me, at least one genre, zombies, I pretty much do not read anymore because I am honestly sick and tired of it. I have kept up with The Walking Dead comics (in hardcover compilation), but even that is starting to wear thin and feel more like a chore.

Having said that, I do agree with the author that these things do come in waves. Anyone remember the vampire wave we had not that long ago with stuff like Twilight and True Blood?

Copyright was never meant to be a welfare system for artists. It was never meant to keep paying them in retirement. It was meant to be an incentive to create, and once it worked, that was it.

And therein lies the problem with copyright as it has been expanded and implemented today.

From “Can Anyone Name a Programmer Still Getting Paid for Code He Wrote in 1962?" published in TechDirt.

There are peculiar joys attached to the implements of reading. When we collect books, we are collecting happiness. When we build up a little library, we are bolstering the delight of life.

—Zeno Philaton (1697-1742).

Quote found in the book Shelf Life.

Reading feeds the brain. It is evident that most brains are starving to death.

Quote by Benjamin Franklin, found in the book Shelf Life.

The quote remains relevant and accurate as ever today.

retrogasm:

There’s a pussy joke in there somewhere but damned if I know what it is…

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I am sure there is more than one pussy joke here, but I am also damned if I got any.

retrogasm:

There’s a pussy joke in there somewhere but damned if I know what it is…

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I am sure there is more than one pussy joke here, but I am also damned if I got any.